Posts tagged ‘Hipstamatic’

June 13, 2015

roses in Regent’s Park

roses in Regent's Park

On a sunny afternoon in June, what better way to spend your time than strolling around a rose garden, then settling down on a bench with a book?

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

roses in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

My reading was slightly disrupted by some over-amorous pigeons in the euphorbia, but they were quite entertaining.

pigeons in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

pigeons in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

Although Queen Mary’s Gardens is famous for its huge rose beds, there are plenty of other pretty plants to enjoy as well.

flowers in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

plants in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

plants in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

flowers in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

flowers in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

The gardens can sometimes get a bit too crowded with people, but they’re not too bad on a weekday afternoon during term-time, and I was delighted to discover the flowerbeds were crowded with lots of bees, instead.

bees in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

bees in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

bees in Queen Mary's Gardens, Regent's Park

You can’t beat a sunny June day in a pretty flower-filled park, can you?

[photos taken with the Hipstamatic app, using the Buckhorst H1 lens, Blanko film and Jolly Rainbo flash]

June 12, 2015

return to the Hill Garden

return to the Hill Garden

I took these photos a month ago, on a sunny but breezy afternoon when I walked up to the top of Hampstead to see the wisteria at the Hill Garden.

wisteria at the Hill Garden

It was fairly empty when I arrived, but I soon noticed there was a crowd of what seemed to be art students wandering around with rolls of chicken wire and tape, and opted to steer myself away from them so that I could enjoy the romance of the place the way I like it best: in solitude.

the pergola at the Hill Garden

the pergola at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

the pergola at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

the pergola at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

wisteria at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

at the Hill Garden

under the pergola at the Hill Garden

[photos taken with the Hipstamatic app, using the Susie Lens, Ina’s 1935 film and Jolly Rainbo flash]

There are earlier posts about the Hill Garden here and here.

June 4, 2015

Obscura Day in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Obscura Day in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

I’ve mentioned my love of graveyards several times on this blog, so you can imagine my interest when I learned about a guided tour of the one Magnificent Seven cemetery I hadn’t been to yet. The tour was part of this year’s Obscura Day, an annual event organised by Atlas Obscura to encourage people to celebrate and explore the world’s interesting places.

Welcome to Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Like the other Magnificent Seven cemeteries, Tower Hamlets Cemetery was originally created to alleviate overcrowding in London’s smaller cemeteries, but unlike the others, it no longer has any of the original cemetery buildings (it was bombed several times during WW2), and much of the site has been transformed into woodland.

A glorious sight currently greets you as you come in via the main gate, with masses of pretty pink flowers dotted around the graves. I was rather charmed by the frame-style gravestones that provide windows through which to see the rest of the cemetery beyond.

a mass of pink flowers in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

peace and pink flowers on a pretty grave in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Fred's Savill's horse grave in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

As well as pointing out some of the interesting people buried in the cemetery, our guide also told us about some of the edible or otherwise useful plants that grow there — more than I’d have realised or recognised on my own (I need to up my foraging game!).

wildflowers in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

gravestones amongst greenery in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

wonky gravestones in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

headless in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

pint size penny graves in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Walking down the paths lined by lovely trees full of birdsong it was easy to forget we were in the middle of Zone 2, just around the corner from all the traffic on Mile End Road, surrounded by housing estates. Many of the graves are half-hidden by encroaching plantlife, but the site is well-managed to ensure the graves are not completely engulfed, although in some cases, nature sometimes seems to be winning.

pathway in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

half-submerged gravestone in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

gravestones amongst greenery in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

cleavers on a gravestone in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

tree eats gravestone in Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

[photos taken with the Hipstamatic app using the Bettie XL lens, Kodot XGrizzled film and Jolly Rainbo flash]

You can read other posts about the Magnificent Seven here, and there’s a post about an earlier Obscura Day event here.

May 12, 2015

return to Kensal Green

A couple of weeks ago I went for a wander through Kensal Green, one of London’s Magnificent Seven cemeteries. I didn’t take many photos, but the atmosphere inspired me to take a few with the Hipstamatic app on my old phone. I used to love experimenting with the different combinations of lenses/films, but I haven’t really played around with it much of late. This particular combination has always been a favourite of mine because of the way it imparts a timeless dream-like quality that is perfectly suited for old stone structures in the sunshine.

Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery

[photos taken with Hipstamatic, using the BettieXL lens and Kodot XGrizzled film]

As the post-title suggests, this wasn’t my first visit to Kensal Green, you can read my previous posts here: Kensal Green Cemetery // Faces of Kensal Green.

October 3, 2014

hollow and dancing

Last Sunday, after visiting the Isokon Gallery with a friend, we went for a walk on Hampstead Heath. Although I do know my way around it pretty well, there are still all sorts of little paths I’ve never been down before, and sometimes they take me off track from where I’m aiming at, which is what happened on Sunday. I was taking him to see the hollow tree, but I went down a new path and we managed to circumnavigate the entire glade the tree is in. Serves me right for getting cocky about knowing my way around.

Anyway, I’d been for a walk on the Heath a few days before, and taken photos then, including the hollow tree, so I thought I’d post some of those.

beech tree, Hampstead Heath
I love beech trees. At the end of August they started dropping their nuts, and for weeks I spent several peaceful moments sitting alone under the beech tree canopies, just listening to the pop-plop of the nut-cases falling to the ground and splitting open. I thought about foraging for them, but beech nuts only have a good season every 3-5 years, and a bit of internet research led me to find that the last good season was 2011 (which by all reports was spectacular), and this year the nuts have no meat on them. They still make a pleasing crunch when you walk over them, though.

tiny shoot, Hampstead Heath
Even as the season dies, there’s always a spurt of new life somewhere.

hollow tree, Hampstead Heath
Hello hollow.

dancing trees, Hampstead Heath
These trees, opposite the hollow tree, always look to me like they are dancing.

michaelmas daisies, Hampstead Heath
I always know it’s September when I see the michaelmas daisies. I love them.

Himalayan balsam, Hampstead Heath
This is Himalayan balsam, aka Policeman’s Helmet, Gnome’s Hatstand and (my favourite), Love-on-a-mountain. It is very pretty but very invasive because it can shoot its seeds up to seven metres, and bees adore it, which means that native plants don’t get pollinated. They actually have it under control on the Heath, and there aren’t that many plants, so when you see them it’s a nice surprise, because it is so pretty. The flowers and seedpods are edible, which is one way to deal with it (although I’ve not tried it myself), but as with any invasive plant you have to be careful not to tread the seedpods anywhere else. Probably best just to admire it from afar.

rosebay willowherb, Hampstead Heath
And this is rosebay willowherb, aka fireweed (because it grows well on burnt, damaged soil), which is also an invasive and also edible. I actually ate it earlier this year when the young leaves were out, very young leaves have a bit of a zingy citrus taste and were an interesting addition to salads. In my experience it has to be eaten as fresh as possible as the leaves got a bit tough after a day or two in the fridge, but they tasted OK chucked into a soup, so they weren’t wasted (it’s very high in nutrients, too!). I wanted to make some fireweed jelly this summer but again, despite its invasive nature, they keep it under control on the Heath, and I didn’t want to take all the blossoms from only a few plants because then no one else could enjoy them (not that this stopped somebody else from stripping them instead). There’s always next year.